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Hall of Honor

1988 Union Hall of Honor

Webtrax Admin

Herbert March

"Principal Chicago leader of the Packinghouse Workers Organizing Committee, CIO (1937-1943). Orator, tactician, successful organizer, visionary of the Left."

Although March joined the Armour and Company plant in 1922, within a year he formed the Stock Yards Labor Council and served on its Executive Board. In 1937 he became the district director of the CIO Packinghouse Worker's Organizing Committee. Through the organizing efforts of March, Armour as well as Swift and Wilson recognized organized labor by 1941. Throughout his career, March promoted equal pay regardless of gender or race.


Agnes Nestor

"Organizer of her fellow glove makers at age 18; Strike leader at 23; President of the Chicago Women's Trade Union Leagues, President of her International Union by 1915."

During her career, Nestor was devoted to the cause of organized labor and the rights of women. In 1897, she founded the International Glove Makers Union and became its first president. In addtion, Nestor was involved in the Women's Trade Union League in which she provided support for female unionists through educational work. During 1913-1948 she was the president of the Chicago chapter of the Women's Trade Union League.


Sol Brandzel

"Born to the tailor's trade; his life dedicated to the Union; skillful manager of the Midwest Joint board, ACTWU, now a servant of the people of Chicago."

As a labor lawyer, Brandzel supported the right of labor from both men and women. He served in leadership position for the National Labor Relations Board, the Amalgamated Clothing Workers, the Board of Education of the Chicago Public Schools, and the Coalition of Labor Union Women. Brandzel sought equal treatment and pay for females. In addition, he was an advocate of child care center for working parents.