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Hall of Honor

1991 Union Hall of Honor

Webtrax Admin

Reverend Addie L. Wyatt

“Bearer of Good News to the workplace, powerful advocate of women’s concerns, and a national leader of her Union.”

Wyatt began her career in 1944 as a member of the United Packinghouse Workers of America at Amour and Co. As she became active in organized labor, Wyatt became a proponent of women’s rights in the workplace. In 1947, she was a member of the Anti-Discrimination and Women’s Activities League. As president of the UPWA during the 1950s and 1960s, Wyatt promoted women’s leadership at all levels. To further this cause, she was a co-founder and vice-president of the Coalition of Labor Union Women in 1974.


Msgr. John J. Egan

“Both man of God and man of Action, trail blazer for social justice in Church and Community, renowned as a friend of Labor.”

Since the 1930s, Egan sympathized with the rights of workers while studying Christian Humanism in seminary school. Throughout his life Egan promoted social justice for all: the right of every human life to dignity and the opportunity to earn a living based on fair wages. As an ordained priest he spoke out on behalf of organized labor for such groups as the Chicago Stock Yards, Hotel Workers, and the Chicago Federation of Labor.


Rabbi Jacob J. Weinstein

“An ethical guide in Labor’s quest for Fair Play and Fair Reward, arbitrator of disputes, and champion of Social Justice.”

As a religious leader of Chicago’s KAM Temple, Weinstein advanced the cause of organized labor thoughout his career. During World War II he served on the Chicago Area War Labor Board. Weinstein was active in civil rights during the 1960s as a leader of the Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity and was an officer of the Public Review Board of the United Auto Workers.